Cheyanne Elder, Richard Tallbull, offers a prayer on the grounds of what would become DIA, October 3, 1991

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The following comment arrived today on the 2009 post “DIA and ancient Indian burial grounds” from a man named George Zachystal:

HELLO PEOPLE OF GOOD USA,

MY NAME IS GEORGE ZACHYSTAL I AM WRITING YOU AS CANADIAN (CZECH BORN) FROM CZECH REPUBLIC WHERE I RESIDE PRESENT TIME BASICALLY IN EXILE DUE TO OUTGOING ELECTRONIC HARRASMENTS DONE TO ME IN HOME TOWN VANCOUVER, BC. THESE ABUSES HAVE NOT STOPPED HERE IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC AS WELL, BUT AT LEAST I HAVE MY FAMILY SUPPORT WHILE IT LOST. Read the rest of this entry »

In an article that originally appeared in Indian Country, Simon Moya-Smith makes a connection to the Ground Zero mosque

Simon Moya-Smith

controversy and the secret indian burial grounds that DIA was built upon (a topic this blog has touched upon before.)

Albeit, if the voices of protest aren’t speaking loudly enough, the spirits most certainly are. Pass through any one of the concourses at DIA — especially Terminal A — and one will detect the subtle, familiar sounds of American Indian flute. The high harmonies play on a continual loop, serenading frequent fliers from camouflaged speakers behind glass cases displaying old Indian trinkets and blouses.

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DIA capstone

DIA capstone

Glenn of Denver says he has found a plethora of Masonic symbology connecting the DIA conspiracy to other prominent Denver locations:

I just moved to Denver area to be near my kids and while property hunting would chk satilite maps on mapquest to give me a sense of the area. I commented to my daughter than the Denver Int Airport looks just like a Swastika. My daughter informed me that conspiracy people say DUMBs (deep underground military base)are under DIA. Well, an internet check showed all kinds of interesting info from contriversial murals to the masonic plaque dedicating DIA as The “New World Airport”. Seems many folks think a New World Order is to be useing the DIA airport and with ( Im serious) aliens in the deep underground levels. Well, being retired Im game for a mystery ! Read the rest of this entry »

Haunted PlacesIn 2000, paranormal researcher Dennis William Hauck put Denver International Airport on his list of eerie spots around the world in his book “The International Directory of Haunted Places.”  By this time, people had long been reporting strange encounters with ghosts and other parnormal activity at Denver’s airport.

Here’s what Hauck said:

Denver International Airport: This high-tech showplace was a humbling experience for many engineers. Over a year late opening owing to techincal problems, the new Denver airport was built on land considered sacred by Native Americans. This was confirmed by experts in Feng Shui, the Chinese art of placing human structures in harmony with nature. When they surveyed the airport, they said the site was “full of images of death and grief.” In spring 1995, Colorado Indians held a ceremony to put their ancestors’ spirits to rest.

Read more about Indian burial grounds at DIA.

DIA's huge pedestrian bridge.

DIA's huge pedestrian bridge.

Is DIA built on top of ancient Native American graves?

Such rumors are certainly part of the airport’s folklore among DIA employees and frequent travelers. This is usually in reference to the pedestrian bridge arching between the main Jeppesen Terminal building  and Concourse A. It is on these moving walkways that visitors will hear the sounds of  Native American chants being played from speakers in a continuous loop. Officially the recordings are part of the extensive DIA art program and have been playing non-stop, 24-hours a day since the airport’s opening 14-years-ago.

As the story goes, the airport was constructed on top of burial grounds and spiritual sites used for centuries by the native tribes that populated the Front Range before the coming of the White Man. The perpetual playing of Native American songs in the 365-foot-long bridge was originally initiated by officials as a way to placate any angry spirits who might want to pull a Poltergeist or The Shining on one of the nation’s busiest airports. People in the conspiracy theory world think the burial ground may have connections to the Navajo writing in the floors at DIA and the dead Native American women seen in the Tanguma murals.

When asked, DIA spokespeople laugh-off the notion that the music has anything to do with angry spirits or that the land where the airport sits was a burial site for ancient tribes. Noting that little archeological evidence of Indian burial sites has ever been found around DIA, they surmise that the rumor had its origin in a ceremony that was performed around the time of  DIA’s groundbreaking in the late-80’s by various Native American shaman to bless the new facility. Anything else is pure conjecture, they assert.

What they don’t mention is the secret ceremony conducted on the grounds of the airport in 1995.

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